NOVELS PUBLISHED:

The Quiddity of Will Self (Hardback 2012, Paperback to be published March 2013)

The ghost of a beautiful young woman, Sylvie, hovers outside the window of Will Self's study. She is seeking to influence his latest novel, before she can rest in peace. Sylvie was a member of the WSC - a mysterious cult of charismatic writers who appear to worship Will Self. When Richard, a twenty-something idler and literary wannabe, discovers Sylvie's dead body he gets sucked into their dark world of absinthe, cloaks and bizarre initiation rites, slowly losing his sense of perspective on the strange events that encircle him. What is the true nature of the WSC? What did they do to Sylvie? And does Richard now face a similar fate?

You can read an extract from Part 2 of the novel by clicking here.

To read a round-up of reviews for Quiddity click here

NOVELS FOR YOUNG ADULTS:

Blackout (Faber & Faber 2010. French edition: Naive Livres. German edition: Franckh-Kosmos)

Winner of the Stockport Schools Award. Awarded 2nd place in the Lancashire Book of the Year Awards. Longlisted for the Carnegie. Shortlisted for the Manchester Book of the Year Awards and the RED (Falkirk) Book Award.

Blackout is currently being turned into a play by a theatre company in Belgian.

Extract from a review in The Daily Telegraph by Martin Chilton:

"Blackout is set in a near future Britain where, because of the threat of social disorder and terrorism, books are banned or 'ReWritten' in sanitised formats. Even Harry Potter (by supposedly encouraging children to try magic) is deemed dangerous enough to be banned. The spirit of Orwell hangs over Mills's book. CCTV cameras are everywhere. It's a time of public hangings, an era when books and iPods are burned and confiscated. Some terrorists and transgressors are even stoned to death in public.

Children are encouraged to take 'Behaviour Pills' to be docile and accepting about their lives. The result, in Mills's book, is a "slow, simple, dull generation who never question anything".

Growing up in this environment is the main character, Stefan, whose Dad owns a bookshop. Although this is novel of ideas it is also a pacy, chase thriller. That action of the book is sparked by the father's decision to shield a dangerous writer called Omar.

After his father is arrested, Stefan eventually goes on the run. He can't trust anyone. He is on constantly shifting ground as he decides who is telling him lies and who is telling the truth. He has to face up to some harsh truths about his mother and father. He is captured by the state and brainwashed into shooting someone. He has to break a code written secretly into a copy of Paradise Lost to work out what is going on.

Into the mix of political satire and dangerous thriller, Mills also weaves the story of a bewildered teenager. As Stefan, 16, puts it: "There was a dark river between being a boy and being a man and I wasn't sure how to cross it."

It won't do to give away too much of the plot but Mills creates some excellent set-pieces - including a disturbing scene of tooth-pulling - in a novel that is full of thought-provoking ideas for an young adult reader. Her book has already been deservedly shortlisted for a Red House Book Award and a Stockport Schools Award."

'It’s fiction, it’s ridiculous, it’s fantastical – but read a paper after you’ve finished and prepare to be disturbed by the parallels ... this is a thought-provoking read that will leave you more than a little nervous about where our society is heading.' SFX magazine

 

Boys Who Saved the World (Faber & Faber 2007)

Currently being made into a feature film... 

 

A Nicer Way to Die (Faber & Faber 2006)